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'Mountain lion' in Edmond was just an ordinary cat, state wildlife officials say

This photo taken in Edmond was thought to be a possible mountain lion. State wildlife officials said Friday the animal in the photo was determined to be just a house cat. [PHOTO PROVIDED BY ODWC]
This photo taken in Edmond was thought to be a possible mountain lion. State wildlife officials said Friday the animal in the photo was determined to be just a house cat. [PHOTO PROVIDED BY ODWC]

It turns out the mountain lion in Edmond was just a kitty cat.

A photo of a possible mountain lion in an Edmond neighborhood that circulated wildly over social media on Thursday turned out to be just a house cat, according to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

"While mountain lions do pass through Oklahoma and the Wildlife Department has confirmed over 30 sightings since 2002, the animal spotted yesterday in Edmond was not a mountain lion," state wildlife officials reported on the agency's Facebook page. "ODWC game wardens at the scene were able to investigate the photo and evidence to pass along to ODWC biologists for further analysis. Both wardens and biologist were able to confirm the animal in the photo was a house cat that appeared larger due to the topography and angle of the photo."

Micah Holmes, spokesperson for the Wildlife Department, said state wildlife officials can determine the size of the animal by measuring its tracks.

"If you know where the picture was taken, if you can have a really good idea where that cat was, you can get a pretty good idea of the size of the animal just by taking some measurements," he said. "That's what we did and it was house-cat size."

The last confirmed sighting of a mountain lion in Oklahoma was in July 2019 in Adair County.

Hunting for mountains lions in Oklahoma is not allowed, but since 2007 it has been legal in the state for anyone to kill a mountain lion to protect life or livestock. The law requires the carcass to be turned over to the Wildlife Department within 24 hours. No mountain lion carcass has ever been turned over to the Wildlife Department under the law.

Ed Godfrey

Ed Godfrey was born in Muskogee and raised in Stigler. He has worked at The Oklahoman for 25 years. During that time, he has worked a myriad of beats for The Oklahoman including both the federal and county courthouse in Oklahoma City for more... Read more ›

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