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Hot Property: The $30 million mansion that once got Prince in hot water

Built by contractor and noted playboy Hal B. Hayes in the 1950s, this 18,000-square-foot mansion was built to withstand a nuclear blast and features a sealed underground cave accessed by an underwater tunnel. [THE OPPENHEIM GROUP/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE]
Built by contractor and noted playboy Hal B. Hayes in the 1950s, this 18,000-square-foot mansion was built to withstand a nuclear blast and features a sealed underground cave accessed by an underwater tunnel. [THE OPPENHEIM GROUP/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE]

LOS ANGELES — Above the Sunset Strip, a palatial estate with a wild Hollywood history is for sale at $29.995 million.

Since its inception, the 18,000-square-foot stunner has drawn looks and made headlines for its over-the-top style and for the string of high-profile names attracted to its eccentricity.

L.A. contractor and noted partyer Hal B. Hayes built the home in 1953, erecting a six-level steel-and-glass showplace that would serve as the ultimate bachelor pad. According to the Los Angeles Times, he included a mirrored master suite, orchid greenhouse, rooftop garden, artificial beach for topless tanning and an indoor-outdoor lagoon that accessed a secret, sealed underground cave aerated with oxygen tanks.

Hayes' home was equipped for an all-night rager or a nuclear war.

Over the years, other owners included film producer Ted Fields and Rockstar energy drink creator Russ Weiner. The prime property reached its peak of notoriety, however, when NBA star Carlos Boozer bought it in 2005.

As Boozer told the Undefeated, he couldn't live in the home during the basketball season and decided to lease it out to a mystery renter who allegedly offered $95,000 a month. The big spender eventually revealed himself to be Prince, and the next time Boozer returned home, the iconic musician had stylistically overhauled the entire place.

Gold lions on the 12-foot gates were replaced with the Prince symbol. Italian carpets were stripped in favor of bold shades of purple and black. The master suite featured a heart-shape bed. The spare bedroom had been turned into a hair salon, the weight room a dance floor.

Boozer sued Prince for violating the lease, according to the Smoking Gun, but later said the pop star smoothed things out by wiring him $500,000 and promising to return the home to standard form by the end of the lease. Boozer said he kept his word.

Today, the home carries an extravagant style, but with much less purple. Across 2.15 acres, it centers on a 10-bedroom, 13-bathroom mansion of more than 18,000 square feet, with a ballroom, wine cellar, two-story gym and solarium. Also included is an English Tudor home on an adjacent lot. Outside, amenities include a fountain, tennis court and resort-style pool with a grotto and water slide.

Jason Oppenheim, who stars in Netflix's "Selling Sunset," is listing the property with Mary Fitzgerald and Peter Cornell, of the Oppenheim Group, and Brian Stace, of Pinnacle Estate Properties.

In the rear view

The longtime Bel-Air home of Lee Iacocca, the late automobile titan who brought Chrysler Corp. back from the brink of bankruptcy in 1979, has sold for $19.5 million.

Owned by the Iacocca family since the early 1990s, the gated estate came up for sale in January for $25.999 million and entered escrow in March, just as the coronavirus threw a wrench into L.A.'s real estate market. But unlike the many pending sales that have fallen out of escrow during the pandemic, the multimillion-dollar transaction closed last week.

Set on more than an acre, the two-story home has a grand foyer with arched ceilings, a wood-paneled den and a great room. There are five fireplaces, including two in the expansive master retreat. A total of five bedrooms and eight bathrooms includes an apartment for staff.

French doors lead out to a stone pavilion, a swimming pool and formal gardens. Also on the grounds is a lighted tennis court.

Iacocca and his family were the original owners of the property.

The former Ford and Chrysler executive, who died last year at 94, helped pioneer the Mustang and Pinto lines while at Ford in the 1960s. In 1979, Iacocca joined Chrysler as its chief executive and helped stabilize the auto manufacturer that had been left in ruins by previous finance-trained chairmen.

He was featured last year as a character in the Oscar-winning film "Ford v Ferrari."

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Related Photos
<strong>In the 2000s, the home was owned by former NBA player Carlos Boozer, who leased the property to the late pop star Prince. [THE OPPENHEIM GROUP/TNS]</strong>

In the 2000s, the home was owned by former NBA player Carlos Boozer, who leased the property to the late pop star Prince. [THE OPPENHEIM GROUP/TNS]

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-e16cba8a60f765d8e1fad0b1b0b49226.jpg" alt="Photo - In the 2000s, the home was owned by former NBA player Carlos Boozer, who leased the property to the late pop star Prince. [THE OPPENHEIM GROUP/TNS] " title=" In the 2000s, the home was owned by former NBA player Carlos Boozer, who leased the property to the late pop star Prince. [THE OPPENHEIM GROUP/TNS] "><figcaption> In the 2000s, the home was owned by former NBA player Carlos Boozer, who leased the property to the late pop star Prince. [THE OPPENHEIM GROUP/TNS] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-b591d736865b2832df31c3595e933647.jpg" alt="Photo - The estate of late automobile titan Lee Iacocca in Los Angeles' Bel-Air neighborhood sold for $19.5 million after listing for sale in January at about $26 million. [TYLER HOGAN/TNS] " title=" The estate of late automobile titan Lee Iacocca in Los Angeles' Bel-Air neighborhood sold for $19.5 million after listing for sale in January at about $26 million. [TYLER HOGAN/TNS] "><figcaption> The estate of late automobile titan Lee Iacocca in Los Angeles' Bel-Air neighborhood sold for $19.5 million after listing for sale in January at about $26 million. [TYLER HOGAN/TNS] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-9cc9ad7bc80bb8a72daca04744b116f4.jpg" alt="Photo - Built by contractor and noted playboy Hal B. Hayes in the 1950s, this 18,000-square-foot mansion was built to withstand a nuclear blast and features a sealed underground cave accessed by an underwater tunnel. [THE OPPENHEIM GROUP/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE] " title=" Built by contractor and noted playboy Hal B. Hayes in the 1950s, this 18,000-square-foot mansion was built to withstand a nuclear blast and features a sealed underground cave accessed by an underwater tunnel. [THE OPPENHEIM GROUP/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE] "><figcaption> Built by contractor and noted playboy Hal B. Hayes in the 1950s, this 18,000-square-foot mansion was built to withstand a nuclear blast and features a sealed underground cave accessed by an underwater tunnel. [THE OPPENHEIM GROUP/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE] </figcaption></figure>
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