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Coronavirus in Oklahoma: Blue Cross and Blue Shield to waive telemedicine copays

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma announced Thursday it would be waiving telemedicine copays. [AP Photo/Mark Lennihan]
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma announced Thursday it would be waiving telemedicine copays. [AP Photo/Mark Lennihan]

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma, the primary health insurance provider in Oklahoma, announced Thursday it would be temporarily waiving copays for telemedicine appointments.

The move is in response to the COVID-19 public health emergency.

Copays for telemedicine -- the practice of meeting with health professionals through virtual (Facetime, web chat, etc.) means -- will be waived retroactively to March 15.

BCBSOK said benefits may differ under certain employers' self-funded health plans.

There are two ways eligible, fully-insured members can use their telemedicine benefits:

* Contact a BSBSOK in-network provider who offers the service

* Via the Virtual Visits benefit, powered by MDLIVE. Members can consult a board-certified doctor licensed in Oklahoma 24/7/365. Members can active their MDLIVE account by calling (888-976-4081); visiting MDLive.com/BCBSOK; text BCBSOK to 635-483; or by downloading the MDLIVE app.

Related Photos
In this Jan. 14, 2019 photo, Caitlin Powers sits in the living room of her Brooklyn apartment in New York, and has a telemedicine video conference with physician, Dr. Deborah Mulligan. Widespread smartphone use, looser regulations and employer enthusiasm are helping to expand access to telemedicine, where patients interact with doctors and nurses from afar, often through a secure video connection. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

In this Jan. 14, 2019 photo, Caitlin Powers sits in the living room of her Brooklyn apartment in New York, and has a telemedicine video conference with physician, Dr. Deborah Mulligan. Widespread smartphone use, looser regulations and employer enthusiasm are helping to expand access to...

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-d1dcb0b7eb03268a04f0cd3c43d5217e.jpg" alt="Photo - In this Jan. 14, 2019 photo, Caitlin Powers sits in the living room of her Brooklyn apartment in New York, and has a telemedicine video conference with physician, Dr. Deborah Mulligan. Widespread smartphone use, looser regulations and employer enthusiasm are helping to expand access to telemedicine, where patients interact with doctors and nurses from afar, often through a secure video connection. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)" title="In this Jan. 14, 2019 photo, Caitlin Powers sits in the living room of her Brooklyn apartment in New York, and has a telemedicine video conference with physician, Dr. Deborah Mulligan. Widespread smartphone use, looser regulations and employer enthusiasm are helping to expand access to telemedicine, where patients interact with doctors and nurses from afar, often through a secure video connection. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)"><figcaption>In this Jan. 14, 2019 photo, Caitlin Powers sits in the living room of her Brooklyn apartment in New York, and has a telemedicine video conference with physician, Dr. Deborah Mulligan. Widespread smartphone use, looser regulations and employer enthusiasm are helping to expand access to telemedicine, where patients interact with doctors and nurses from afar, often through a secure video connection. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)</figcaption></figure>
Ryan Sharp

Ryan Sharp is the sports editor of The Oklahoman and a lifelong Oklahoman but was born in Texas, something he doesn't share too often with his OU- and OSU-loyal friends. Ryan spent a good chunk of his early childhood in southeast Oklahoma,... Read more ›

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