live: Watch live: White House addresses coronavirus outbreakLive updates: Oklahoma coronavirus cases now 879; 34 dead

NewsOK: Oklahoma City News, Sports, Weather & Entertainment

Work to resume on The Hill in Deep Deuce

Construction of The Hill, shown here looking west toward downtown, is set to resume this summer after being stalled since 2018 when developer Bill Canfield was declared in default of deadlines agreed to with the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority. [DAVE MORRIS/THE OKLAHOMAN]
Construction of The Hill, shown here looking west toward downtown, is set to resume this summer after being stalled since 2018 when developer Bill Canfield was declared in default of deadlines agreed to with the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority. [DAVE MORRIS/THE OKLAHOMAN]

A developer declared in default of his agreement with the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority to create a neighborhood in Deep Deuce is getting a 13th chance and five more years to get the job done.

Bill Canfield, a scientist in the nearby Oklahoma Health Center, was a newcomer to downtown development when he was chosen to develop “The Hill,” which boasts a sweeping view of downtown and is between Interstate 235, Walnut Avenue, NE 1 and NE 2.

The original agreement called for 153 townhouses to be built along with a community pool and “town hall.” Notable residents have included former Thunder star Kevin Durant with most homes selling in the half-million-dollar range.

The project, stalled multiple times, was halted again in 2018 as Urban Renewal commissioners declared the development in default of deadlines that had been extended a dozen times.

The development started in 2006 and was originally due for completion in 2009. In the time taken by Canfield to develop The Hill, the downtown skyline has seen the addition of the 50-story Devon Energy Center, the 27-story BOK Park Plaza Tower, West Village, and hundreds of apartments and for-sale homes.

Cathy O’Connor, director of the Urban Renewal Authority, said Monday Canfield is required to start construction this summer and that the entire project is due to be completed by the end of 2025.

“What we are doing is not entering into a 13th or 14th new amendment,” O’Connor said. “We are entertaining into a new agreement with the developer. We are agreeing to a slightly increased purchased price of $1 million ($8.20 per square foot) to reflect the higher property values in the area.”

Related Photos
<strong>Hundreds of apartments, stores and the Aloft Hotel in Deep Deuce and the Steelyard in Bricktown had yet to be conceived or built when Bill Canfield was awarded development of The Hill as shown in this 2006 aerial photo. [THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES]</strong>

Hundreds of apartments, stores and the Aloft Hotel in Deep Deuce and the Steelyard in Bricktown had yet to be conceived or built when Bill Canfield was awarded development of The Hill as shown in this 2006 aerial photo. [THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES]

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-6afc6a0d0d3e83c762f1ad2569a8c5b4.jpg" alt="Photo - Hundreds of apartments, stores and the Aloft Hotel in Deep Deuce and the Steelyard in Bricktown had yet to be conceived or built when Bill Canfield was awarded development of The Hill as shown in this 2006 aerial photo. [THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES] " title=" Hundreds of apartments, stores and the Aloft Hotel in Deep Deuce and the Steelyard in Bricktown had yet to be conceived or built when Bill Canfield was awarded development of The Hill as shown in this 2006 aerial photo. [THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES] "><figcaption> Hundreds of apartments, stores and the Aloft Hotel in Deep Deuce and the Steelyard in Bricktown had yet to be conceived or built when Bill Canfield was awarded development of The Hill as shown in this 2006 aerial photo. [THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-9992f777e133912a002943ddc635a949.jpg" alt="Photo - Construction of The Hill, shown here looking west toward downtown, is set to resume this summer after being stalled since 2018 when developer Bill Canfield was declared in default of deadlines agreed to with the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority. [DAVE MORRIS/THE OKLAHOMAN] " title=" Construction of The Hill, shown here looking west toward downtown, is set to resume this summer after being stalled since 2018 when developer Bill Canfield was declared in default of deadlines agreed to with the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority. [DAVE MORRIS/THE OKLAHOMAN] "><figcaption> Construction of The Hill, shown here looking west toward downtown, is set to resume this summer after being stalled since 2018 when developer Bill Canfield was declared in default of deadlines agreed to with the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority. [DAVE MORRIS/THE OKLAHOMAN] </figcaption></figure>
Steve Lackmeyer

Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter, columnist and author who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's... Read more ›

Comments