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Hearing postponed for case against Epic Charter Schools

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A lawsuit contending dual-enrollment policies at Epic Charter Schools has been moved to another hearing date.

Judge Aletia Haynes Timmons rescheduled a hearing for the case to 2 p.m. Nov. 14 in Oklahoma County District Court.

Three sets of parents sued Community Strategies, the organization that operates Epic, after their children were unenrolled in August and September. Epic notified the families that the children would be removed from its rolls because they also were attending a private school.

One of the families had two children attending a private school five days a week. The other two families, with two and three children respectively, attended a private school twice a week.

The lawsuit argued state law allows children to be enrolled in a public and private school at the same time, as long as no public school funds contribute toward a child's private education.

The case also claims that removing the children was a violation of their right to a free public education. The parents — April and Andrew Grieb, Amy and Andy Brooks, and Charissa and Jacob Dearmon — conteded Epic discriminated against them based on their income level being high enough to afford a private school.

Dual-enrollment has been the subject of a state investigation into Epic, the state's largest virtual charter school. The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation has alleged the Epic illegally inflated its enrollment counts with students who were also enrolled in private schools or were home-schooled. Many of these students received little to no education from Epic, OSBI agents reported.

The OSBI is also investigating Epic's use of a Learning Fund to support students' extracurricular activities. Epic has denied any wrongdoing.

Related Photos
<strong>Epic Charter Schools in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019. [Bryan Terry/The Oklahoman]</strong>

Epic Charter Schools in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019. [Bryan Terry/The Oklahoman]

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-349f9f850522c1760941c65fe8555d49.jpg" alt="Photo - Epic Charter Schools in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019. [Bryan Terry/The Oklahoman] " title=" Epic Charter Schools in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019. [Bryan Terry/The Oklahoman] "><figcaption> Epic Charter Schools in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019. [Bryan Terry/The Oklahoman] </figcaption></figure>
Nuria Martinez-Keel

Nuria Martinez-Keel joined The Oklahoman in 2019. She found a home at the newspaper while interning in summer 2016 and 2017. Nuria returned to The Oklahoman for a third time after working a year and a half at the Sedalia Democrat in Sedalia,... Read more ›

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