Oklahoma liquor stores see sales spike amid outbreakHow to make your own face mask to help stop the spread of the coronavirusLive updates - Oklahoma coronavirus confirmed cases: 1,159; 42 dead

NewsOK: Oklahoma City News, Sports, Weather & Entertainment

Laugh Lines and Other Wrinkles: Instant recall

Trying to store passwords, appointments, important dates and more can be taxing on the memory bank. [METRO CREATIVE]
Trying to store passwords, appointments, important dates and more can be taxing on the memory bank. [METRO CREATIVE]

Recently, I read where some medical genius was experimenting with a pill that would heighten your intelligence and expand your memory.

The catch? It only lasts for 30 minutes after its ingested, and you can only take one pill a day. Pretty well narrows you down to finding your car keys, cell phone, grocery list and glasses. So, I can’t see it ever making the top shelf of the drugs aisle.  

 I don’t pretend to know how my mind works (or doesn’t), but obviously my brain capacity is limited. You can only store so many phone numbers, children’s birthdays, dental appointments, plumber’s names and tire pressure numbers before going into overload.

When you’re talking with friends and remember the name of Frank Sinatra’s first wife but can’t come up with your trash pickup day, you know you have too many statistics stored and need to be selective about adding anything new to remember. When someone tells you something, it’s important to determine the odds of whether it’s anything you will ever need to mention again, or if you do, whether anyone will care. Try to clear out some of the picky little bits your brain insists on remembering, like recipes, your  grandson’s ACT score (unless it’s high and he looks like you), the date of your husband’s hole-in-one and the last time you checked your water gauge.

 I would hold on to the color of Bradley Cooper’s eyes, how often your hair needs color, where your car is parked and the last four digits of your Social Security number.

Peggy Gandy

Humorist Peggy Gandy, retired Oklahoman Society editor/columnist, takes a tongue-in-cheek look at everyday life. Read more ›

Comments