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Nature & You: The connection between a 'dead language' and feeding wild songbirds

You think your cheap bird seed is a bargain, but your hungry songbirds might be singing a different tune. [METRO CREATIVE CONNECTION PHOTO] 

You think your cheap bird seed is a bargain, but your hungry songbirds might be singing a different tune. [METRO CREATIVE CONNECTION PHOTO] 

Connection between "dead language" and feeding songbirds

Latin has been dubbed a "dead" language. It is pretty obvious the vast majority of people nowadays cannot speak, much less understand, the Latin language.

Caveat emptor.

Ah, ha! I caught you! So you do, in fact, understand some Latin phrases. You readily recognize this expression as "buyer beware."

Permit me to segue into a discussion of the topic of bird feeders and the seeds that we put in them. In particular, how is the consumer to know what to buy and for how much? I'd encourage you to resist the "Siren's call" of those bird seed packages that are lowest-priced and dominated by lots of red-colored seeds. This is a case where the prettiest and the cheapest is not the wisest purchase choice.

What is designed to tempt the buyer is what you will discover, in the end, is just so much waste that will eventually be snubbed by the birds, and you'll just be paying for something that rots and is not of any practical benefit to the birds.

If you have to narrow your bird seed purchase to just one item, you can't really go wrong with black oil sunflower. It does cost a little bit more, but you're not throwing your money away on something that won't be appreciated by the wild songbirds.

Et tu, Brute?

Oops!

I couldn't resist!

— Neil Garrison, NewsOK Contributor

Neil Garrison was the longtime naturalist at a central Oklahoma nature center.

Neil Garrison

Neil Garrison is an outdoor nature enthusiast. He is a graduate of Oklahoma State University/Stillwater; he earned a B.S. degree in Wildlife Ecology. Prior to his 2009 retirement, he was the Naturalist at a central Oklahoma nature center for 30... Read more ›

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