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Coffee Creek neighbors say no way to 191 houses

What was once a historic windmill greeting golfers at the Coffee Creek Golf Course for decades may be replaced with 191 single family homes since the course was sold and closed in January. [PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN]

What was once a historic windmill greeting golfers at the Coffee Creek Golf Course for decades may be replaced with 191 single family homes since the course was sold and closed in January. [PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN]

EDMOND — Nearby homeowners say the construction of 191 single family homes isn't going to happen on the land that was once the Coffee Creek Golf Course in northwest Edmond.

“There is no way we are going to sit by and let this happen,” said Tonya Coffman, president of the Coffee Creek Homeowners Association. “We have several options.”

Coffman would not explain their options.

A preliminary plat for the proposed development has been filed with the city's planning department.

Surrounding property owners have hired an attorney and plan to fight the development on 181 acres that was once a golf course in their backyards for decades.

“Homeowners are so tired of allowing them to turn dirt and rip out another tree,” Coffman said. “Things have gotten out of hand.”

Randel Shadid, attorney for new property owners SACC Investments LLC, said the zoning for the property will not have to be addressed because it is already zoned single family.

“The plat meets city code,” Shadid said.

“He is entitled to his opinion,” Coffman said when asked about Shadid's comment.

The proposed lots, ranging in size from 6,000-square-feet to 8,400-square-feet, will be constructed next to 3,000- to 5,000-square-foot homes on larger lots, costing between $400,000 and $500,000.

The intent for six sections of land, along Kelly Avenue, Coffee Creek Road and N Boulevard, are marked on the proposed preliminary plat as “developable land unknown,” leaving nearby property owners concerned there will be commercial property proposed at a later time.

“Everything is a mess,” said Realtor Cindy Daniel, whose home once backed up to the 18th hole on the golf course that had been there for 26 years. “We bought our home on a golf course.

“If I wanted to sell my property, I couldn't even tell them what is going to be behind my house.”

Daniel estimates she would have gotten $435,000 for her home sitting on the golf course.

“Now, I'm lucky if I could get $350,000. That is a major drop. I think it is horrible what happened.

“This is going to destroy our property values,” she said.

Upset Coffee Creek homeowners have been meeting since the golf course was sold and closed in January. Property owners met again this week after the preliminary plat was filed.

Former owners, Millennium Golf Properties, decided in December 2015 to sell the golf course property. Some in the neighborhood said they were surprised when the deal was done.

Andy McCormick, former Coffee Creek Golf Course director of operations, said the golf course was shut down Jan. 13 after the $1.25 million sale closed the day before.

The 2016 market value is listed on the assessor's records at $2.8 million.

City Planning Director Randy Entz said the preliminary plat will be heard Sept. 19 by the planning commission.

“We have not started our review,” Entz said of the plat.

Entz described a portion of the property is in the flood plain and can't be built on.

“The lots are toward the smaller end,” Entz said.

Shadid said he has had several meetings with the homeowners association board and expects to meet again with them again soon.

He said he expects there to be a community connection meeting with the developer and homeowners in late August or early September. A date has not been set at this time.

Coffman questioned whether there would be a community connection meeting.

Planning officials said they have received questions and concerns from nearby homeowners since the property sold in January.

Paul and Janet Weigel, who live on Hollowdale, have repeatedly written planning officials about how the proposed development will devastate the neighborhood where some people have lived for more than over 25 years.

"We know that a major goal of the preliminary plat review process is to ensure that the lives and well-being of over 300 families in this community are not negatively or unfairly impacted by any proposed changes," the Weigels wrote, outlining a city ordinance that promises a beneficial impact on the public health, safety and welfare.

The letters and emails talked about the increase of traffic and the outcome if commercial property, apartments or a nursing home are build where fairways were once played.

The proposed preliminary plat was called "ill-conceived and overtly greedy."

"The preliminary plat review plan will destroy vast number of trees and negatively impact the area's nature and wildlife, which has been an integral part of our neighborhood since 1992," the Weigels wrote. "Commercial development would mean the destruction of our neighborhood."

Related Photos
<p>The former Coffee Creek Golf Course land is now proposed to be the site for 191 single family homes. The golf course, formerly a horse ranch, was in operation for 26 years after being designed by Ronald E. Rosser. The once horse stable, but later used for the golf operation, has been torn down. [PHOTO BY DIANA BALDWIN, THE OKLAHOMAN]</p>

The former Coffee Creek Golf Course land is now proposed to be the site for 191 single family homes. The golf course, formerly a horse ranch, was in operation for 26 years after being designed by Ronald E. Rosser. The once horse stable, but later used for the golf operation, has been torn down....

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-d7bb38f462cf48f12d3b8f9f5a3c840e.jpg" alt="Photo - The former Coffee Creek Golf Course land is now proposed to be the site for 191 single family homes. The golf course, formerly a horse ranch, was in operation for 26 years after being designed by Ronald E. Rosser. The once horse stable, but later used for the golf operation, has been torn down. [PHOTO BY DIANA BALDWIN, THE OKLAHOMAN] " title=" The former Coffee Creek Golf Course land is now proposed to be the site for 191 single family homes. The golf course, formerly a horse ranch, was in operation for 26 years after being designed by Ronald E. Rosser. The once horse stable, but later used for the golf operation, has been torn down. [PHOTO BY DIANA BALDWIN, THE OKLAHOMAN] "><figcaption> The former Coffee Creek Golf Course land is now proposed to be the site for 191 single family homes. The golf course, formerly a horse ranch, was in operation for 26 years after being designed by Ronald E. Rosser. The once horse stable, but later used for the golf operation, has been torn down. [PHOTO BY DIANA BALDWIN, THE OKLAHOMAN] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-3f9524ef75490f03e5093d819fbfb193.jpg" alt="Photo - What was once a historic windmill greeting golfers at the Coffee Creek Golf Course for decades may be replaced with 191 single family homes since the course was sold and closed in January. [PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN] " title=" What was once a historic windmill greeting golfers at the Coffee Creek Golf Course for decades may be replaced with 191 single family homes since the course was sold and closed in January. [PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN] "><figcaption> What was once a historic windmill greeting golfers at the Coffee Creek Golf Course for decades may be replaced with 191 single family homes since the course was sold and closed in January. [PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN] </figcaption></figure>
Diana Baldwin

Diana Baldwin has been an Oklahoma journalist since 1976. She covered the Oklahoma City bombing and covered the downfall of Oklahoma City police forensic chemist Joyce Gilchrist misidentifying evidence. She wrote the original stories about the... Read more ›

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