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Edmond Exchange: Weekly wrap-up of what is going on in Edmond

Water tower in place

Resolutions were approved this week to offer bond sales of up to $140 million to fund part of a $300 million water and wastewater project that will take place over the next five years.

The bonds will be paid from revenues collected through utility charges to customers, said City Attorney Steve Murdock.

"Extensive rate reviews were done in conjunction with the engineering design for these projects that will be constructed with these bonds," Murdock said. "The rate increases we are currently following are based on the ability of these rates to produce sufficient revenue needed to pay the debt being issued."

One of the few most visible parts of the project is construction of a 167-foot tall water tower north of Coffee Creek Road and east of Boulevard. The large bowl of the water tower was raised to its permanent position on the 2-million-gallon tower on Sunday. It took more than 2.5 hours to complete the job.

Workers used 20 to 30 heavy duty cables attached to a hydraulic lift system to raise the bowl.

"They would raise it eight inches, adjust every cable and repeat until it reached the top," said Casey Moore, the city's public information officer.

City officials made a time-lapse video of the bowl being raised. Go to Oklahoman.com to see the video.

The tower, to be the largest in Edmond, is costing nearly $5.9 million. The city has six water towers, each holding a half-million gallons of water. The new tower will mostly serve residents of northwest Edmond.

Trails resurfacing work

Resurfacing work started this week on the J.L. Mitch Park and Coffee Creek trails. The project is to last two weeks. A top seal coat will be put on the Coffee Creek Trail and then on the Mitch Park Trail to lengthen the life of the trails and assist in weatherproofing. The trails will remain open during the work.

Landscaping to highlight art

City council members agreed this week to spend up to $48,000 to landscape around the sculpture, Touch the Clouds, located on Second Street on the University of Central Oklahoma campus.

The project includes sidewalks, landscaping and park benches. The money will come from the council contingency fund.

"The final step is to finish the site improvements around this significant art piece to complete the project," said Assistant City Manager Steve Commons.

City council members in November 2013 approved purchase of the statue from the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Association for $50,000. The sculpture had stood outside the Houston Astrodome since 1998 before it arrived in Edmond on May 24, 2015.

The city spent $171,184 in public money to purchase, move and install the piece on a new base. Local public art supporters raised another $30,000 to restore the sculpture to its original patina.

The sculpture by David McGary, who died in 2013 and was a noted western sculptor, was sandblasted, cleaned and taken through repatination to the original finish it received at the foundry in 1999.

Water changes possible

The city announced this week it might purchase water from Oklahoma City to supplement the city's water supply during periods of high demand, during spring and summer months. Edmond officials want people to be aware because some home dialysis machines may need adjustment due to the disinfection system used by Oklahoma City. Although people typically do not notice any change, kidney dialysis machines may require a different method of operation. Oklahoma City uses chloramines and Edmond uses chlorine, which is termed “free” chlorine, for disinfection. If notification for medical reasons is needed, call 216-7775. Fish aquariums with filters may require a different method of operation due to the chloramine disinfection process. Fish owners should contact the pet store for instructions.

Offices closed

City of Edmond offices will be closed Monday for Memorial Day. Trash pickup will be delayed one day throughout the week.

It's a fact

Edmond Public Schools, with 2,807 employees, is the largest employer in Edmond. The University of Central Oklahoma comes in second with 1,427 employees, and the city of Edmond is third with 726 employees, according to the Edmond Economic Development Authority Edmond Economic Abstract.

Need answers?

Reader David Watts asked: "Are there plans for the city to upgrade the clubhouse at KickingBird Golf Club?

Head Golf Professional Brian Soerensen answered: "Yes, there are plans for a new clubhouse at KickingBird Golf Club in future years. We have presented the need for a new clubhouse to the Capital Improvement Projects Advisory Board. It has been identified as a potential project in the six to 10-year range from now. The clubhouse was built in 1971 with very few renovations since then. A new clubhouse would be an asset for the city of Edmond and would be designed with the entire community in mind, not just golfers."

Have questions about Edmond and its road construction, the hotel and conference center, traffic, new capital improvement projects or anything else? Email your questions to dbaldwin@oklahoman.com. Edmond Exchange will find an answer.

Email Diana Baldwin at dbaldwin@oklahoman.com

Follow her on Twitter @Edmond_beat

Related Photos
<p>Construction of the bowl of the city's new water tower is shown in January. The bowl has been lifted on the 167-foot tall tower and is now in place. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]</p>
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Construction of the bowl of the city's new water tower is shown in January. The bowl has been lifted on the 167-foot tall tower and is now in place. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]  

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-231ebe7db048c826ffc5e8b35faea9ec.jpg" alt="Photo - Construction of the bowl of the city's new water tower is shown in January. The bowl has been lifted on the 167-foot tall tower and is now in place. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]   " title=" Construction of the bowl of the city's new water tower is shown in January. The bowl has been lifted on the 167-foot tall tower and is now in place. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]   "><figcaption> Construction of the bowl of the city's new water tower is shown in January. The bowl has been lifted on the 167-foot tall tower and is now in place. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]   </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-44a3f5a09fc33a93ef15b4b6f61e3e37.jpg" alt="Photo - The bowl of the city's new 2-million-gallon water tower at Coffee Creek Road and Boulevard has been lifted from the ground and into place. [PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN] " title=" The bowl of the city's new 2-million-gallon water tower at Coffee Creek Road and Boulevard has been lifted from the ground and into place. [PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN] "><figcaption> The bowl of the city's new 2-million-gallon water tower at Coffee Creek Road and Boulevard has been lifted from the ground and into place. [PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN] </figcaption></figure>
Diana Baldwin

Diana Baldwin has been an Oklahoma journalist since 1976. She covered the Oklahoma City bombing and covered the downfall of Oklahoma City police forensic chemist Joyce Gilchrist misidentifying evidence. She wrote the original stories about the... Read more ›

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