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Edmond Exchange: Weekly wrap-up of what is going on in Edmond.

Organic asparagus available form the Urban Agrarian is for sale during the 2016 opening weekend of the Farmers Market at Edmond's Festival Market Place. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES]

Organic asparagus available form the Urban Agrarian is for sale during the 2016 opening weekend of the Farmers Market at Edmond's Festival Market Place. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES]

Market time

Edmond Farmers Market opens for the season on Saturday. It will be open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Festival Market Place in downtown.

Fresh produce, cut flowers and Made in Oklahoma items will be available each Saturday through Oct. 28.

Shoppers can find Angus beef, pies, breads, eggs, honey, wine, pasta, cheeses and other Made in Oklahoma products.

A weekly cooking demonstration, highlighting products available at the market, is a new feature this year. Visitors also can pick up recipes.

The market will not be open May 6 during the Downtown Edmond Arts Festival.

Special Wednesday markets will take place from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 7 to Aug. 16. Wednesday markets are located in J.L. Mitch Park at the parking lot between the basketball court and baseball fields.

Economic abstract ready

Edmond Economic Development Authority recently released its 2017 Edmond Economic Abstract. The 10-page economic profile, published annually by the authority and sponsored by Francis Tuttle Technology Center, contains demographic information including population, income levels, cost of living, crime figures, traffic counts and more. The abstract also features information on Edmond's residential and commercial real estate markets, tax collections and education information. Copies are available at the Edmond Economic Development Authority, 825 E Second St., Suite 200, or go to www.eeda.com.

Covell turn lanes

City council members this week approved an almost $2.6 million contract with Cimarron Construction Company to pay for left-turn lanes on Covell Road at Santa Fe Avenue and Bryant Avenue intersections.

City staff recommended the Cimarron contract out of the four bids received for the work which is expected to be completed in four months.

"A lot of people will be glad when this is completed," said City Manager Larry Stevens.

Work at both intersections is considered to be short-term improvements, because Covell Road is expected to be turned into a four-lane parkway throughout the city.

Easements and utility work have been completed for the future parkway project, which also added to the cost, said Assistant City Manager Steve Commons.

Money will come from a special tax approved in 2000 for capital improvements.

Covell widening finishing

The widening of Covell Road, from Fairfax Boulevard to Interstate 35 is almost complete. City Manager Larry Stevens said all of the concrete paving has now been completed and the contractor is working on striping, signing, lighting, signals and cleanup. The roads in the area could be opened by the end of April, ahead of schedule.

Sales tax down

Continuing declining sales tax numbers have caused city staff to adjust this fiscal year's revenue projections downward to a -1 percent.

This year's budget had been calculated with zero growth, but after receiving the 10th check of the year the budget was adjusted.

"Our cumulative total for the year is now 1.81 percent below our zero growth budget projections," said City Manager Larry Stevens.

Last month, the sales tax figures were 1.68 percent, Stevens said.

This month's sales tax collection check was almost $4.8 million. This check was for the last two weeks of February and the first half of March.

"Overall, we are still doing fine," Stevens said. "When you look at other sales tax in other cities, we are fine. Fine, but not where we are used to being."

Wintertime jug line fishing

Jug line fishing will become a permanent fishing method at Arcadia Lake during the winter months, city council members voted this week.

The fishing will be allowed from Nov. 1 until the last day of February each year.

Council members in August agreed to allow the jug line fishing on a temporary basis until February at which time the method was reviewed.

The reason behind the jug line fishing is to increase fishing activity and revenue at the lake during the offseason, said Parks Director Craig Dishman.

During the trial period, Dishman said, "Staff received several positive comments from fisherman with no major complaints."

City staff and Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Department officials said the permanent ordinance would attract more fisherman without affecting the lake's fish population or boating activity.

In jug line fishing, lines are suspended from floating jugs to catch fish, mostly catfish.

Only 20 jugs will be allowed per fisherman, and the person's name, address and telephone number must be written on the jug.

It's a fact

Edmond Electric has 36 line workers who cover nine substations, 600 miles of underground lines, 500 miles of overhead lines and a large number of transformers in Edmond. Tuesday has been declared by Mayor Charles Lamb as Lineman Appreciation Day. The line workers are on the dangerous job and on call 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to keep the electricity flowing, Lamb said this week.

What's happening

Edmond Planning Commission meets at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at 20 S Littler Ave.

Edmond Fine Arts Institute's Spring Sampler Evening of Art begins at 7 p.m. Saturday at Oak Tree Country Club.

Need answers?

Have questions about Edmond and its road construction, the hotel and conference center, traffic, new capital improvement projects or anything else? Email your questions to dbaldwin@oklahoman.com. Edmond Exchange will find an answer.

Email Diana Baldwin at dbaldwin@oklahoman.com

Follow her on Twitter @Edmond_beat

Related Photos
<p>A shopper picks out some tomatoes during the 2016 Edmond Farmers Market in Edmond. [PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES]</p>

A shopper picks out some tomatoes during the 2016 Edmond Farmers Market in Edmond. [PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES]

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-67c6bd31302b9b8c62dbb18677fe9d72.jpg" alt="Photo - A shopper picks out some tomatoes during the 2016 Edmond Farmers Market in Edmond. [PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES] " title=" A shopper picks out some tomatoes during the 2016 Edmond Farmers Market in Edmond. [PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES] "><figcaption> A shopper picks out some tomatoes during the 2016 Edmond Farmers Market in Edmond. [PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-2dbf8c8a7a113282b73777b98ee070bd.jpg" alt="Photo - Organic asparagus available form the Urban Agrarian is for sale during the 2016 opening weekend of the Farmers Market at Edmond's Festival Market Place. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES] " title=" Organic asparagus available form the Urban Agrarian is for sale during the 2016 opening weekend of the Farmers Market at Edmond's Festival Market Place. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES] "><figcaption> Organic asparagus available form the Urban Agrarian is for sale during the 2016 opening weekend of the Farmers Market at Edmond's Festival Market Place. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES] </figcaption></figure>
Diana Baldwin

Diana Baldwin has been an Oklahoma journalist since 1976. She covered the Oklahoma City bombing and covered the downfall of Oklahoma City police forensic chemist Joyce Gilchrist misidentifying evidence. She wrote the original stories about the... Read more ›

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