Live updates - Oklahoma coronavirus confirmed cases: 1,252; 46 dead

NewsOK: Oklahoma City News, Sports, Weather & Entertainment

Around the interfaith meal table

Oklahoma City metro residents participate in "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]
Oklahoma City metro residents participate in "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]
Oklahoma City metro residents from different faith communities recently gathered for food and fellowship at a downtown Oklahoma City church.

The free event called "An Interfaith Meal: “A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea” was Oct. 9 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral, 127 N.W. 7. The Rev. William Tabbernee, executive director of the Oklahoma Conference of Churches, said the meal was the idea of the conference's Religions United Committee and was designed to bring people together to learn about each other's faith traditions in an informal setting. 

Guests were assigned to tables where they ate light refreshments and talked about topics viewed through the lens of their respective faith traditions. Each table included a set of questions designed to get the conversation ball rolling, so to speak.

Questions included: "Do people of your faith engage in feasting and fasting to celebrate your community events?" and "What does your faith tradition say about loving, blessing and praying for your enemies?"  

Oklahoma City metro residents take part in an interfaith discussion as part of "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]
Oklahoma City metro residents take part in an interfaith discussion as part of "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]

Different faith traditions represented included Mennonite, Catholic, Muslim, Unitarian, Buddhist, United Methodist, Baptist, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and Pentecostal. People who described themselves as atheist or agnostic also participated.

"I think we learned that underneath the differences we have, we still share commonality," Tabbernee said afterward. 

More interfaith opportunities

U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Robert Bacharach will be the keynote speaker at the Interfaith Alliance Foundation Annual Awards Dinner set for Thursday, Oct. 20, at the Oklahoma History Center, 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive.

Bacharach will speak about "The Importance of an Independent Judiciary in Preserving our Democracy." Gene Rainbolt, BancFirst founder and chairman, will be awarded the foundation's Harley Venters Humanitarian Award. The Community Service Award will be given to Steven Charles who heads RockTown, a youth mentoring program for under-served and under-supported youth in south and northeast Oklahoma City.

Dr. Carl Rubenstein, a retired cardiologist who serves as the foundation's president, said dinner will begin at 6 p.m.

"We are a a non-partisan, grassroots organization dedicated to promoting the positive, healing role of faith in civic life and challenging intolerance and extremism," Rubenstein said in a news release.

For more informationabout tickets and foundation membership, go to www.tiaok.org.

--------------------

Allen D. Hertzke, David Ross Boyd Professor of Political Science at the University of Oklahoma, will be the keynote speaker at the OCC Annual Dinner on November 10, 2016. Professor Hertzke is an internationally renowned expert on Religion and Politics. The title of his keynote speech will be “Why Religious Freedom Matters – Especially Now.”

For more information about the event and to register, go to http://okchurches.org.

Carla Hinton

Religion Editor 

Related Photos
Oklahoma City metro residents participate in "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]

Oklahoma City metro residents participate in "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-e6ff554343057a9279e36df982531e7e.jpg" alt="Photo - Oklahoma City metro residents participate in "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]" title="Oklahoma City metro residents participate in "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]"><figcaption>Oklahoma City metro residents participate in "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-10b7140319ae2f8b667ca9191aaa760d.jpg" alt="Photo - Oklahoma City metro residents take part in an interfaith discussion as part of "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]" title="Oklahoma City metro residents take part in an interfaith discussion as part of "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]"><figcaption>Oklahoma City metro residents take part in an interfaith discussion as part of "An Interfaith Meal: A Mediterranean Afternoon Tea" at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, 127 NW 7. [Photo by Carla Hinton, The Oklahoman]</figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-958363203f4c84450d22bb13ae13861b.jpg" alt="Photo - " title=""><figcaption></figcaption></figure>
Carla Hinton

Carla Hinton, an Oklahoma City native, joined The Oklahoman in 1986 as a National Society of Newspaper Editors minority intern. She began reporting full-time for The Oklahoman two years later and has served as a beat writer covering a wide... Read more ›

Comments