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Space is big asset for Edmond police in new public safety center

A replica of the Edmond Police Department seal is embedded in the lobby floor of the new public safety center. Officers are seen walking around the emblem. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]

A replica of the Edmond Police Department seal is embedded in the lobby floor of the new public safety center. Officers are seen walking around the emblem. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]

EDMOND — Edmond police in October moved into the nearly $37 million public safety center on the southeast corner of Littler Avenue and First Street.

The state-of-the-art, 70,000-
square-foot building also houses public safety communications and emergency management operations. There is a 38-inmate jail in the basement.

Police Chief Bob Ricks calls the center one of the finest in the state.

“We looked at multiple facilities from around the region,” Ricks said. “We took what we felt were the best features of those buildings and incorporated them into our design.

“We learned from others on what worked well, what didn't and why.”

Room to grow is one of the biggest assets of the new center.

“The new technology adds a level of safety to our staff,” Ricks said. “We were able to add a permanent Department of Human Services worker in our building to work hand-in-hand with our officers on calls.

“Also, our patrol division is now located on the bottom floor, which makes access in and out of the building smoother and reduces a possible delay on response times.”

Voters in October 2011 approved a half-cent tax for five years to pay for the three-story downtown building and a second, 15,000-square-foot building near 33rd Street and Broadway for the police department's crime lab and storage for evidence and vehicles.

When the tax ends in April 2017, the public safety center will be debt free.

By the numbers

The department has 120 officers and 36 civilian employees, and it includes criminal investigative, administrative and patrol divisions.

Within the department are school resource officers working in all the high and middle schools and Boulevard Academy; lake officers assigned to Arcadia Lake; motorcycle officers; a dive team; a bomb squad; a SWAT team; and a canine unit.

The police department holds its own police academies. The last academy was in the fall of 2015, when 14 recruits made it through to the field training portion of the process. Another academy is not scheduled at this time.

For 2015, the police department received 31,268 calls for service and conducted 26,005 traffic stops.

Officers made 482 arrests on felony complaints and another 1,657 arrests on misdemeanor complaints. Officers recorded 235 people booked into jail on drunken driving complaints. Another 131 people received citations for shoplifting.

Police made 357 transports for mental health reasons, totaling 12,720 miles.

Officers wrote 19,262 warning tickets to people for various violations throughout the city.

There were 1,516 traffic crashes for 2015, down slightly from 2014. There were three fatality crashes, up from the previous year. There were six automobile/pedestrian collisions, up 16 percent from 2014.

Five automobile/bicycle collisions were reported in 2015, up 40 percent. There were 12 motorcycle wrecks, down 50 percent from 2014.

During the past year, there were six automobile/deer collisions, down 116 percent from 2014.

The time of day for most crashes was from 5 to 6 p.m. Monday and Wednesday were the days of the week with the most crashes.

October was the month with the most crashes, with 158 total.

“We work hard each day to uphold our motto of trustworthy service,” Ricks said. “We train continually so that our officers are prepared to respond in the proper way in many different situations.”

Related Photos
<p>Officers file into the lobby after the October dedication ceremony for the nearly $37 million public safety center. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]</p>
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Officers file into the lobby after the October dedication ceremony for the nearly $37 million public safety center. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]  

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-53e9efbf46b547659d0dbd4dc7420130.jpg" alt="Photo - Officers file into the lobby after the October dedication ceremony for the nearly $37 million public safety center. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]   " title=" Officers file into the lobby after the October dedication ceremony for the nearly $37 million public safety center. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]   "><figcaption> Officers file into the lobby after the October dedication ceremony for the nearly $37 million public safety center. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN]   </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-61d64ac1b0b7b77972bd52b1ca890bf4.jpg" alt="Photo - Cadets take their oaths during Edmond Police Academy graduation. [Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman] " title=" Cadets take their oaths during Edmond Police Academy graduation. [Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman] "><figcaption> Cadets take their oaths during Edmond Police Academy graduation. [Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-9f818782a0d006e6cb117c8574681dbd.jpg" alt="Photo - A replica of the Edmond Police Department seal is embedded in the lobby floor of the new public safety center. Officers are seen walking around the emblem. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN] " title=" A replica of the Edmond Police Department seal is embedded in the lobby floor of the new public safety center. Officers are seen walking around the emblem. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN] "><figcaption> A replica of the Edmond Police Department seal is embedded in the lobby floor of the new public safety center. Officers are seen walking around the emblem. [PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN] </figcaption></figure>
Diana Baldwin

Diana Baldwin has been an Oklahoma journalist since 1976. She covered the Oklahoma City bombing and covered the downfall of Oklahoma City police forensic chemist Joyce Gilchrist misidentifying evidence. She wrote the original stories about the... Read more ›

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