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Despite terrorism fears Paris is still expensive

Paris is open for business, but visitors appear to be rethinking their plans to travel there.
Paris is open for business, but visitors appear to be rethinking their plans to travel there.

Whenever there is a natural disaster or terrorism at an international destination there is often the school of thought that says "Hey, if you've ever really wanted to go to Y, now would be a good time because of X".

In reality that's not always the case. The US State Department issued a worldwide travel alert last week citing attacks in Paris, Denmark, Mali and others as the primary reasons for the alerts. That will give many Americans some pause when they're deciding what their travel plans are over the next few months.

In some cases after hurricanes deals can be had if you're willing to travel somewhere that might not be operating at 100 percent. But airfare is a remarkably hearty commodity. A quick search of Kayak for flights from OKC to Paris in March is still what it might have been before the tragic attack last month -- about $1,100 per person round trip, on average. If demand is down, airlines are likely to simply trim flights rather than offer deep discounts.

And a quick check of Parisian hotels for a trip three months out also shows that nobody is quite ready to blink. Prices are about what they always are, about $200 per night on average in the areas most people like to stay.

That doesn't mean Parisian hoteliers and restaurateurs aren't feeling the pinch. According to the Financial Times business is bad:

"A survey by Synhorcat, the French hotel and restaurant operators’ union, suggests that sales in the city’s cafés, bars and brasseries during the past week are down 44 per cent on the same period last year, while hotels have suffered a 57 per cent drop in business."

How long it lasts depends on a variety of factors including future incidents. If things are quiet, expect springtime in Paris to be as busy, and expensive, as always.

Related Photos
Paris is open for business, but visitors appear to be rethinking their plans to travel there.

Paris is open for business, but visitors appear to be rethinking their plans to travel there.

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-79af51b0aec8a5227367432db986ad6f.jpg" alt="Photo - Paris is open for business, but visitors appear to be rethinking their plans to travel there. " title="Paris is open for business, but visitors appear to be rethinking their plans to travel there. "><figcaption>Paris is open for business, but visitors appear to be rethinking their plans to travel there. </figcaption></figure>
Matt Patterson

Matt Patterson has been with The Oklahoman since 2006. Prior to joining the news staff in 2010, Patterson worked in The Oklahoman's sports department for five years. He previously worked at The Lawton Constitution and The Edmond Sun.... Read more ›

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