developing: Coronavirus in Oklahoma: Joe Exotic not exposed to any known COVID-19 cases in Oklahoma jail, officials saydeveloping: Stitt urges more Oklahomans to get tested as more mobile sites spring upLive updates: Oklahoma coronavirus cases now 879; 34 dead

NewsOK: Oklahoma City News, Sports, Weather & Entertainment

Tonight's blood moon: What's faith got to do with it?

A total lunar eclipse set to occur tonight will have plenty of folks outside hoping to catch a glimpse of this rare occurrence.

Right before a so-called "blood moon" in April 2014, people in various faith communities were abuzz about this phenomena because there were to be four blood moons coinciding with Jewish feast days in 2014 and 2015. 

Tonight's eclipse is the fourth of the blood moons coinciding with Jewish feast days in this two-year time frame. Some Christians believe the blood moons and their timing are tied to biblical prophecy in some way.

Well known Christian evangelist the Rev. John Hagee wrote a book about this phenomena "Four Blood Moons," and a movie based on the book was released in theaters.

The Rev. Mark Hitchcock, pastor of Faith Bible Church of Edmond, also wrote a book on the subject. He discusses the possible connection to biblical prophecy and basically said there isn't one.

Now, there are news reports that tonight's blood moon has aroused the concern of some Mormons.

According to a report by The Associated Press, the fact that the lunar eclipse coincides with a "supermoon" has prompted fears of an "impending apocalypse" among Mormons, so much so that the Mormon church has issued a statement cautioning against such speculation of doom. According to the AP, not only will tonight's eclipse give the moon a red tint (hence the description "blood moon"), but it will look larger than usual. The confluence of the eclipse and this "supermoon" won't happen again for 18 years, according to reports.

The Mormon Church's statement is as follows:

"The Church encourages our members to be spiritually and physically prepared for life's ups and downs. For many decades, Church leaders have counseled members that, where possible, they should gradually build a supply of food, water and financial resources to ensure they are self-reliant during disasters and the normal hardships that are part of life, including illness, injury or unemployment.

"This teaching to be self-reliant has been accompanied by the counsel of Church leaders to avoid being caught up in extreme efforts to anticipate catastrophic events.

"The writings and speculations of individual Church members, some of which have gained currency recently, should be considered as personal accounts or positions that do not reflect Church doctrine."

Read my April 2014 story featuring Rev. Hitchcock and his observations on the blood moons here:

NewsOK: "Edmond pastor's book adds to religious conversation about lunar eclipses and biblical prophecy"

And get out there and catch a glimpse of the eclipse.

Carla Hinton

Religion Editor  

Carla Hinton

Carla Hinton, an Oklahoma City native, joined The Oklahoman in 1986 as a National Society of Newspaper Editors minority intern. She began reporting full-time for The Oklahoman two years later and has served as a beat writer covering a wide... Read more ›

Comments