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Holocaust victims' remains found in France

Rabbi Abby Jacobson, spiritual leader of Emanuel Synagogue, left, and Linda Sweenie, music director of Temple B'nai Israel, preside over a burial ceremony for the remains of an unknown Holocaust victim on Sunday, July 26, at Fairlawn Cemetery in Oklahoma City. [Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman]
Rabbi Abby Jacobson, spiritual leader of Emanuel Synagogue, left, and Linda Sweenie, music director of Temple B'nai Israel, preside over a burial ceremony for the remains of an unknown Holocaust victim on Sunday, July 26, at Fairlawn Cemetery in Oklahoma City. [Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman]

The burial on Sunday of the remains of an unknown Holocaust victim brought a solemn close to an extraordinary set of circumstances.

Members of the Oklahoma City Jewish community, led by Rabbi Abby Jacobson, hosted a traditional Jewish burial ceremony for the remains of an unknown woman killed by the Nazis and denied a proper burial. Read about it here: 

Incredibly, there are other victims of the Nazis who may also be finding their way to a final resting place.

Earlier this month, meticulously labeled tissue samples taken from the bodies of Holocaust victims used in Nazi medical research were discovered in jars and test tubes in a cupboard at the University of Strasbourg in France.

According to news reports, the samples were taken from among 86 Jews who were gassed during experiments. News outlets said the autopsy samples were supposed to be used to prosecute August Hirt, a Nazi anatomy researcher.

On July 20,  the Strasbourg mayor's office said it hopes to return the remains to the local Jewish community for eventual burial in the city. At least one news outlet has reported that the remains are to be buried at the Cronenbourg Jewish cemetery.

Read more about this topic: 

Forward: "French University Hands Over Holocaust Victims' Remains"

The Washington Post: "Remains of Holocaust experiment victims found at French forensic institute."

Carla Hinton

Religion Editor

 

Carla Hinton

Carla Hinton, an Oklahoma City native, joined The Oklahoman in 1986 as a National Society of Newspaper Editors minority intern. She began reporting full-time for The Oklahoman two years later and has served as a beat writer covering a wide... Read more ›

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